Princess

Princess is a modernized children’s series based on Frances Hodgson Burnett’s classic: A Little Princess.

princess

Author: Gabrielle Charbonnet

My Rating: 5/5

 

I first came across the first book: #1 Molly’s Heart, when I was very little, and fell in love with the story. At the time, ebooks were not a thing, and I couldn’t find the other two books in the series.

Recently, I have been getting back into reading on my kindle. While browsing the amazon ebook section I was delighted to find the two remaining books in the Princess series were available to download; and at a great price! I quickly downloaded them both and finished the series in less than a week.

To sum up the series in one word for me would be “cute.”

Molly is a young girl who is the daughter of a very successful and wealthy film director. When her father is called to film a documentary in a location that isn’t best suited for children, she is sent to a prestigious boarding school in Boston.

If you have read A Little Princess, you will find this retelling adorable and entertaining. I generally do not enjoy retellings of classics, but this one was so charming and excellent.

The series is broken into 3 children’s chapter books. From looking at the back of the first book, it says the series is aimed towards an 8-12 reading level age.

I liked how the author of this series kept the characters very similar to the characters in the classic. Molly is imaginative, loving and caring; just like Sara Crewe in A Little Princess.

I really enjoyed the modernized version and would recommend this to any young girls or those like me, who love the original classic.

Manga Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet

romeoandjuliet

Author(s): William Shakespeare (Creator) Richard Appignanesi (Adaptor)

Illustrator(s): Sonia Leong

My Rating: 1/5

 

My past few book reviews have all been all 5/5 reviews, so I figured it was time I review something I just detested.

First things first, I did not take the illustrations in account for this 1/5 rating. If I was to rate the story just based on the illustrations, I would give it 4/5. The illustrations were great.

For the story/adaption side of things, I just couldn’t finish the book. I only give 1/5 stars for books I just can’t finish out of boredom or frustration. (Sometimes both.)

Because I didn’t finish this manga, this review is going to be pretty quick.

I read Romeo and Juliet when I was in 7th grade, and when I came across this manga at work I wondered how a combo of Shakespeare and Manga would turn out. For me, they just don’t mix.

The Romeo and Juliet of this manga is sped up to modern times. I don’t think that was the problem. I just couldn’t like it or bother to continue and finish the story.

My take on this manga is this: If there is a recreation of one of the world’s biggest classics; especially turning it into manga form, there are always going to be a ton of mixed opinion about it. Some will love this story as it is a neat new spin on such a well known play. Some will think it was a meh attempt. Others just don’t think something as classic as Shakespeare should be adapted, period. And then some readers just didn’t like it; which is the category I fell into. I don’t know exactly what it was, I just couldn’t get into. I’d rather reread the play, to be honest.

However, I am writing this review to mention how I think it is very important and an excellent idea of putting classics such as this one, into a manga/graphic novel form. It is a great idea way to get kids, teens, adults (anyone really,) introduced to the world’s greatest classics.

For my personal reading enjoyment though, I won’t be picking up another classic-themed manga anytime soon.

 

Criminal Minds: Finishing School (Criminal Minds #3)

finishingschool

Author: Max Allan Collins

My Rating: 5/5

In case you are new to my blog, I am a true crime addict. I research serial killers in my spare time. I read case files. I love documentaries on famous murderers and villains. I even check out /r/CrimeScene on reddit. This subreddit allows redditors to submit crime stories with actual crime scene photos.  (View at your own risk, it is NSFW.) I have a fascination with the darkest of human nature. This all started when I was 12 or 13 years old when I was flipping through tv channels, I stumbled across Criminal Minds. I can confidently say this show has changed my life.

If you are unfamiliar with the television show, it centres around the FBI’s Behavioural Analysis Unit (BAU.) They investigate and solve the most complex murder cases. They deal with terrorists, pedophiles, murderers and their specialty: serial killers. Now, I am going to admit this book review will be biased because Criminal Minds has always been my all-time favourite show. I can honestly say I have watched every single episode at least three times. (And to give you an idea of the episode count, the show has been renewed for it’s 12th season.)

Because I have been a fan of the show for so long, I was quite surprised to find out I didn’t know there is a book series based on it. I came across this book at my local thrift store and squealed. So as a die-hard Criminal Minds fan I had to get it.

Even though this is the 3rd book in the series, (and to my recent discovery, the last,) you do not need to read the first two to understand what is happening in this one. Like the television show, the book begins with the BAU team given a new case to solve.

The first thing I noticed and liked about this book is that the author gives you a quick rundown on what the BAU is and does; as well as explaining each member of the team. So, if you have never watched the television show, you will still understand the characters and what they bring to the team as individuals.

On the flip side, if you are just as a massive fan of the show as I am, you will be pleased to find out this book does NOT repeat an episode from the show, it is a brand new case! This book features my personal favourite BAU team combo. We have: David Rossi, Aaron Hotchner, Derek Morgan, Emily Prentiss, JJ Jareau, Penelope Garcia and Dr. Spencer Reid. (Who are all briefly described in the first chapter.) Whether you know about the tv show or not, you can pick up this book and understand it.

For a quick summary of the book, here is the rundown: The BAU is called into Minnesota where a horrifying graveyard is discovered in a forest. Three bodies are found, each a young girl wrapped in blankets and sheets. The BAU soon discovers that each girl disappeared ten years ago from different parts of Georgia. They also find out these bodies are not the only victims of this perpetrator.

The BAU works on building a profile of the unsub. (Unknown Subject.) Who he is, his background and why he is taking these girls and holding them for a decade before killing them. Hence, Criminal Minds‘ tagline: The way to a criminal is through his mind.

I gave this book 5/5 because of it kept my interest all through the story. There was no fluff/fillers and the author did an excellent job of portraying the characters. He clearly did his research on the show and characters, as everything was spot-on all through the story.

As I mentioned earlier, this case has not been an episode of Criminal Minds, which impressed me. The case is just as twisted, unique and complex as the ones on the show.

That being said, this story is very dark and parts are very graphic. If you do not like stories about children being abducted, murdered etc, then this is not a story for you. Trigger warnings for this book would be sexual abuse.

However, if you like dark fictional crime books, this is definitely something worth considering picking up.

The Virgin Suicides

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My Rating: 4/5

Author: Jeffrey Eugenides

I watched the movie before I read the book, I know, shame on me, I usually do read the book before seeing the movie. The movie was amazing, I especially loved the music. The soundtrack is without a doubt, my all time favourite movie soundtrack.

Anyways, I haven’t been reading any literary fiction in quite a while, so this was a nice change. While the title itself “The Virgin Suicides” may turn off some, it really is a wonderfully haunting and dreamlike tale. While suicide is an obvious theme, there are so many layers and underlying themes, it is an absolutely beautiful and rich novel.

The story is told in first person from a group of anonymous teenage neighbourhood boys, each with an obsession with the five teenage Lisbon sisters. You never are told which teenage boy is narrating the story, or how many boys are even in the group. (I thought it was totally genius that you never hear from the sisters themselves, in the novel.) The story begins when the youngest Lisbon sister, Cecilia, attempts suicide and later successfully ends her life on her second attempt. The Virgin Suicides is a tale of the 13 months leading up to the suicides of the five Lisbon sisters.

I found while reading this book that the story isn’t really about the sisters. If anything. It was more about how others react to suicide, and how the then-teenage boys (now grown men) are still obsessed with the Lisbon girls and what drove them to their actions. I believe you are never supposed to figure out “why” the Lisbon sisters committed suicide.

Although, I am sure I will reread this book time and time again, trying to figure out the motives and reasoning behind it all, just like the boys (now men) still go over and over the evidence of the Lisbon sisters.

“In the end we had the pieces of the puzzle, but no matter how we put them together, gaps remained, oddly shaped emptinesses mapped by what surrounded them, like countries we couldn’t name.”
― Jeffrey Eugenides, The Virgin Suicides